?

Log in

No account? Create an account

Mon, Apr. 25th, 2005, 09:36 am
janetsalsman: Canterbur-E-Tales

U C - B E R K E L E Y C A N T E R B U R - E - T A L E S


FROM: April 25 to May 1

Meditation:

Come, My Way, My Truth, My Life
by George Herbert

Come, my Way, my Truth, my Life:
such a way as gives us breath;
such a truth as ends all strife;
such a life as killeth death.

Come, my Light, my Feast, my Strength:
such a light as shows a feast;
such a feast as mends in length;
such a strength a makes his guest.

Come, my Joy, my Love, my Heart:
such a joy as none can move;
such a love as none can part;
such a heart as joys in love.


Collect for the Week

O Almighty God, whom truly to know is everlasting life: Grant us so perfectly to know thy Son Jesus Christ to be the way, the truth, and the life, that we may steadfastly follow his steps in the way that leadeth to eternal life; through the same thy Son Jesus Christ our Lord, who liveth and reigneth with thee, in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

This Week's Doings

Holy Eucharist
Eucharist is offered daily at:
All Souls Parish at 9:00 a.m. (Cedar and Spruce)
(except on Thursdays, when it is at noon)
and at: CDSP (2451 Ridge Rd.) at 11:30, except on Thursday when it is
at 5:45 p.m.
and on Wednesdays and Fridays at:
St. Mark's at 12:10 p.m. (Bancroft and Ellsworth)
and on Wednesdays at:
St. Clement's at 11:30 a.m. (Claremont Blvd., near Ashby)

Thursday’s Food for Thought:  Mind-games. As finals, and final papers/projects loom, it's time to put the CRANIUM to a different use. So come prepared to exercise the little grey cells in a more relaxing way. And, to round out the event, bring whatever music you use to calm down.. Dinner at 6:30, discussion following. At Canterbury House (2334 Bancroft, across from the RSF).

Other Noteworthy Events

Next week’s Food for Thought:  Make Us Bread. Meet at 6 at St. Mark’s (next to Canterbury House) to bake bread for the homeless.

Canterblogging!  Send your browser over to:  http://berkcantfound.livejournal.com.  We’ve begun a blog site!  You’ll find announcements, questions, commentary, answers.  Whatever!?  Please visit it often, and chime in the discussion.  If you have any questions, contact Gary!

Canterbury Calendar:  We’ve put the Canterbury Calendar on-line!  Check out the upcoming Food for Thought programs, other dates of interest, where Gary will be preaching/celebrating, even the Eucharistic lectionary for Sundays and Holy Days to come.  You can view it by day, week or month.  If you click on an event, the details will appear in a pop-up window.  Check it out at:   
        http://ical.mac.com/grbrower/BCF32Kalendar.  
If you have iCal, you can subscribe to the calendar at:
        webcal://ical.mac.com/grbrower/BCF32Kalendar.ics

Want to Live at Canterbury House? We have spaces open! Contact Janet (janet@berkeleycanterbury.org) or apply online at www.berkeleycanterbury.org (follow the links for the service learning community).

AmeriCorps: Bonner Leaders Program/Destination College: Interested in serving as a Cal Corps staff member, as a volunteer coordinator at a community organization, or tutoring and mentoring local K-12 youth? You should apply for one of our AmeriCorps Programs (Bonner Leaders, Students in Service, or Destination:College)! All AmeriCorps positions provide an educational award to help you pay for school, and involvement in an intensive leadership training program. Join us! Applications are at: http://calcorps.Berkeley.edu

Soul Food for The Activist: Sustaining Ourselves for a Lifetime of Service Workshop Series. Finding Peace in the Midst of Exams (and Everything Else). Friday, April 29, 12-1:30 pm, Chinquapin - MLK. The end of the year is a roller coaster of feelings, thoughts, anxieties, worries, fears, joys, and excitement. Is it possible to be peaceful in the midst of this? Absolutely. The key is to learn to live fully in the present moment with a deep acceptance of things as they are. This experiential workshop will draw from meditation practices, discussion, and inquiry. We will explore practices, tools and principles for finding peace, balance, and calm amidst the change and busyness of our lives. Diana Winston is a Buddhist teacher, writer, activist, and author of Wide Awake: A Buddhist Guide for Teens. She is the founder of the Buddhist Alliance for Social Engagement. RSVP to ccorps@berkeley.edu

Keeping it All in the Air, Wednesday, May 11, 1:30-3 pm: Meet in Eshleman 505. Be on time as the group will move to an outdoor location! In her 13 years of juggling Erin Stephens has literally and figuratively learned how to "keep it all up in the air". Erin will share her journey as a juggler, and the amazing connection between juggling and every day life. Erin Stephens recently graduated from UC-Santa Cruz. Her research and senior thesis focused on Circus Arts and Social Change. RSVP to ccorps@berkeley.edu

Gary is riding to fight AIDS  From June 5 – 11, Gary will ride in the AIDS/LifeCycle 4, a 585-mile bike ride from San Francisco to Los Angeles, to help alleviate the suffering caused by AIDS and to help further AIDS prevention efforts around the world.  Please support him in his commitment.  Visit http://aidslifecycle.org/6107 to donate, and learn more.

Spiritual and Community Concerns

Suggested Bible Readings

Monday: Mark 1:1-15
Tuesday: Luke 8:1-15
Wednesday: Luke 8:16-25
Thursday: Luke 8:26-39
Friday: Luke 8:40-56
Saturday: Luke 9:1-17
Sunday: John 15:1-8

Collect for UC-Berkeley

O Eternal God, bless all schools, colleges, and universities and especially UC-Berkeley, that they may be lively centers for sound learning, new discovery, and the pursuit of wisdom; and grant that those who teach and those who learn may find you to be the source of all truth; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Pray for:

Japanese train crash victims and their families:
http://sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/n/a/2005/04/25/international/i012958D99.DTL

Give thanks for:

Humor:
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/comics/Bizarro.dtl


Other Stuff

Gary’s Office Hours:

Monday Off
Tuesday            11-1
Wednesday        9:30-10:45
Thursday           2-5
Friday               9:30-11:30

Wed, Apr. 13th, 2005, 10:13 am
calcanterbury: News of the Week

Meditation:

The breaking of the bread. One of the Catholic commentators pointed out this week that the burial of the Pope was just like that for any other Catholic in structure. It was set in the context of the Mass-- a service of the breaking of the bread. I didn’t read or see enough of the funeral itself to know how they distributed communion to hundreds of thousands, but I suspect that most of those present expected to receive the “body of the Lord.” That participation in the liturgy, that participation in the Body of Christ, was part and parcel of their reason for being there, and for going forth.
The breaking of the bread. A phrase appearing twice in four verses of Acts 2. Significant to the early Christians. A sharing of common bread mirroring the sharing of their possessions in common. A testimony to their manner of life. What was whole, individual, became broken that it might be shared. And “day by day the Lord added to their community those destined to be saved” (Acts 2:47b).
The breaking of the bread. In the Emmaus Road story, it too becomes the event in which the participants are changed. What those two disciples had seen, heard and discussed became much more in the “breaking of the bread.” So much more that they discarded any other plans and returned the seven miles from Emmaus to Jerusalem to tell the others.
The breaking of the bread. Whether millions, thousands, or just a few, what we’ve heard today attests to the transformative power of a relatively simple ritual. But what we’ve also heard is that the power of that ritual is not simply internal. Those who witness the power are sent forth as witnesses. As Eucharistic Prayer C puts it, “Deliver us from the presumption of coming to this Table for solace only, and not for strength; for pardon only, and not for renewal. Let the grace of this Holy Communion make us one body, one spirit in Christ, that we may worthily serve the world in his name” (BCP, 372).
Witnesses transformed into witnesses.
“Risen Lord, be known to us in the breaking of the Bread” (BCP, 372).
Amen.

Gary+

Thursday’s Food for Thought:  CDSP Community Night. Meet at Canterbury House at 5:20 to walk over to Church Divinity School of the Pacific. We'll join the seminary community for its weekly Eucharist (at 5:45), dinner and discussion. If you choose to meet us at the seminary chapel (on Ridge Rd, just west of Euclid), please be there by 5:40!


Want to Live at Canterbury House? We have spaces open! Contact Janet (janet@berkeleycanterbury.org) or apply online at www.berkeleycanterbury.org (follow the links for the service learning community).

Wed, Feb. 16th, 2005, 10:39 am
calcanterbury: News of the Week

Meditation:
The Genesis story (Genesis 2:15-17; 3:1-7) is well-known to us all. Adam and Eve are given clear instructions by God on how to behave. They transgress and they realize it. And, as the prototypical humans, their first response is concealment, symbolized by the fig-leaf garments. Later on, they try to shift blame. It doesn’t work-- it’s not a true confession or apology, and they are expelled from the garden. Death becomes part of their lot. What a perfect ancient story to illustrate current psychological research!
What really grabbed me, however, was Psalm 37. Take a look at it-- three verses in: “While I held my tongue, my bones withered away, because of my groaning all day long. For your hand was heavy upon me day and night; my moisture was dried up as in the heat of summer.” Talk about negative effects of inhibition! Continuing on: “Then I acknowledged my sin to you, and did not conceal my guilt. I said, ‘I will confess my transgressions to the Lord.’ Then you forgave me the guilt of my sin.” The result? “Happy are those whose transgressions are forgiven, and whose sin is put away!” Happiness implying wholeness, health.
As far as it goes then, scripture and psychology and physiology are in agreement. But the scriptures go further. And this is the power of the Gospel! Paul declares in Romans that salvation is the free gift of God. While he doesn’t use these words, he implies that the quality of our confession, or apology, does not affect God’s desire, or ability to save us. Through one man, Adam, death came to all. But through one man, Jesus Christ, the free gift of grace comes to all who would receive it. God’s will is to bring all of us back into relationship with each other, and with God’s own self. It is our role to acknowledge that, individually. As our collect put it: “as you [God] knowest their several infirmities [love that traditional language!], let each one find thee mighty to save.”
How do we find God “mighty to save?” Well, I would suggest that the Greater Good articles provide a starting-place. They, on the other hand, simply mirror much of the Church’s traditional counsel about Lent. On Ash Wednesday, many of us heard these words regarding the observance of a holy Lent: “Self-examination and repentance.” Where have we wronged others, including God? What are we afraid to admit to others? God? Ourselves? When it comes to our transgressions against others, can we make a full, and effective, apology? Can we amend our lives?
God’s might to save, however, is greater than our ability to confess. God will forgive an inadequate confession-- I believe that. On the other hand, God’s will for us is health, salvation, and wholeness. The better we call to remembrance, the more complete our self-examination and repentance, the healthier we will be-- studies and scripture both agree!

Gary+

[This meditation is taken from Gary’s sermon Sunday at St. Mark’s. The full text is available at http://www.berkeleycanterbury.org/Gary/Sermons/021305.html.]

Thursday’s Food for Thought: “Exercising the Ignatian Way!” (This has little to do with your diet!) WHAT in the world are the “Ignatian Exercises?” And why might they be good for your spiritual health? Janet Fullmer will help us understand what this traditional spiritual discipline is all about. Dinner at 6:30, program at 7:15.  

Lenten Midweek Eucharist Every Tuesday between now and Holy Week/Spring Break, Canterbury will offer an afternoon eucharist on Tuesdays at 4:10.

The Winter Santa Cruz retreat (Feb 25-27) is still on. We are going to spend time considering the truth/fantasy/history/spirituality of Monty Python’s “Life of Brian” and “Monty Python and the Holy Grail”. No, this is not a joke! Really! So, if you’re interested in going, please let me know this week! We’ll leave Friday afternoon when folks are ready, and return on Sunday by about 2:00 pm. The cost? $35 covers it all!
(Comment on this)

Tue, Jan. 25th, 2005, 11:38 am
calcanterbury: News of the Week!

Meditation:

Something motivated Jesus, upon learning of the arrest of John the Baptist, to leave his carpenter’s shop for Capernaum and, there, to begin his own new life as an itinerant preacher. Did he know where that life would lead? Did he know the hardships along the way? Who knows? He may have had some inkling about the fate of prophets, but that didn’t deter him. The promise of the Kingdom of God sustained him.
Something in Jesus’s presence and preaching motivated Peter and Andrew, James and John to drop their nets one last time and to leave them lying. Whether Jesus’s call to them was actually as brief as Matthew suggests we don’t know. But clearly they were captivated by the promise of a new life. They left job and family behind to follow on a journey with Jesus.
Both Jesus’s realization of his mission and the two sets of brothers’ joining in that mission represent a repentance. We often associate that word “repentance” with some kind of moral shift-- and that can be one interpretation. But, at root, all it means, is a change of mind, or a retracing of one’s steps to return to the right path. Jesus and his four followers changed their minds about their life directions. And the direction of the world’s history was changed as a result.

Thursday’s Food for Thought: Tsunami Theology.  What happened at in SE Asia just after Christmas shakes the faith of many — not just Christians.  How do we make sense of it?  How was God present (absent?)?  Guests for the evening will include a former Canterburian who was in Sri Lanka when the tidal wave hit.  Dinner at 6:30, program at 7:15.

Next week’s Food for Thought:  Make Us Bread—Join us in baking bread for the homeless.  Mixing, kneading and baking starts at 6:00 pm in St. Mark’s Parish Hall (access through the alley between St. Mark’s and Canterbury House).

Cooking for Canterbury: Anyone who would like to cook for one of the Thursday nights should contact Janet S. (janet@berkeleycanterbury.org).

Canterbury Reads:  It’s time to pick up a book that’s not required reading.  Several folks have thought that Gareth Moore’s, A Question of Truth:  Christianity and Homosexuality would be a good read.  And, given the furor over Bp. Robinson, same-sex blessings, and the release of the Windsor Report, they’re probably right!  Day/time will be set soon, but if you’re interested, let Gary know!  In the meantime, see if you can find the book on-line!

Bishop Swing will visit!  The Rt. Rev. William Swing will make his last scheduled visit to Berkeley Canterbury on Sunday, February 13.  The venue will be St. Clement’s Episcopal Church.  The time will be 4:00 pm.  There will be little “formal” program, but we’re asking him to reflect on his 27 years of episcopacy, his thoughts about the Windsor Report, and how he views the future of campus ministry.  Put it on your calendars!

Tue, Jan. 18th, 2005, 11:29 am
calcanterbury: News of the Week!

Meditation:

    Fiat lux.  Let there be light.  The motto of the University of California, Berkeley.  Also a quotation from Genesis 1:3.
    Light infuses the scripture readings at this time of the church year.  God commissions Israel to be a “light to the nations.”  “The people who have walked in darkness have seen a great light.”  “The Lord is our light and our salvation.”  Those lessons are lessons of hope, hope for increasing brightness in a dark situation, mirrored by our hope (i.e., expectation) that the days will grow longer, and the darkness of the winter solstice will be dispelled.
    The metaphor is powerful.  The darkness of sin, dispelled by the light of grace/mercy.  The darkness of ignorance, dispelled by the light of knowledge.  The darkness of chaos, dispelled by the light of order (although there are certainly some folks who would turn that couplet around!)
    The power of the metaphor, however, is compounded when we personalize it.  As Isaiah told Israel, God had commissioned THEM to be a light to the nations.  Jesus told his followers that they were the light of the world.  We reflect the light.  We share the knowledge.  We comfort those experiencing personal darkness.  Light shines on us; we redirect it.
    As Epiphany is the season marking the “manifestations” of God to humanity—Jesus himself being the great Epiphany—we are challenged to remember that we are also epiphanies.  As Jesus was the human face of God while he walked this earth, so are we—the Body of Christ—the human face of God during our time here as well.
    Let us be light this semester.  To those who mourn friends and loved ones lost in the tsunami, let us be light.  To those who will be leaving Cal and heading into some uncertainty, let us be light.  To those with whom we simply disagree, let us be light.

Thursday’s Food for Thought: Welcome Back!  Catch up with folks.  Hear about the upcoming semester.  Kick back and schmooze (it’s an Anglican thang).  Dinner at 6:30 and on . . . Canterbury House (2334 Bancroft Way)

Next week’s Food for Thought:  Tsunami Theology.  What happened at in SE Asia just after Christmas shakes the faith of many — not just Christians.  How do we make sense of it?  How was God present (absent?)?  Guests for the evening will include a former Canterburian who was in Sri Lanka when the tidal wave hit.  Dinner at 6:30, program at 7:15.

Canterbury Calendar:  We’ve put the Canterbury Calendar on-line!  Check out the upcoming Food for Thought programs, other dates of interest, where Gary will be preaching/celebrating, even the Eucharistic lectionary for Sundays and Holy Days to come.  You can view it by day, week or month.  If you click on an event, the details will appear in a pop-up window.  Check it out at:   
        http://ical.mac.com/grbrower/BCF32Kalendar.  
If you have iCal, you can subscribe to the calendar at:
        webcal://ical.mac.com/grbrower/BCF32Kalendar.ics

Canterbury Reads:  It’s time to pick up a book that’s not required reading.  Several folks have thought that Gareth Moore’s, A Question of Truth:  Christianity and Homosexuality would be a good read.  And, given the furor over Bp. Robinson, same-sex blessings, and the release of the Windsor Report, they’re probably right!  D/time will be set soon, but if you’re interested, let Gary know!  In the meantime, see if you can find the book on-line!

Wed, Jan. 12th, 2005, 10:33 am
calcanterbury: Welcome to the Berkeley Canterbury Blog site!

We're glad you've found Berkeley Canterbury's blog site! Please find it a place to ask and answer questions about Berkeley Canterbury, the Episcopal Church, UC-Berkeley, theology, whatever! And we'll hope that the answers are to the point!

Blessings,

Gary